Maggie Eshbaugh's Posts

Three Summits in Bolivia

YESTERDAY WAS A BIG DAY FOR OUR BOLIVIA EXPEDITION- THE TEAM SUMMITED ILLIMANI AT 7:30AM.

We love starting off a post with “CUMBRE!!!” The team has achieved the third successful summit of their trip!

Two days ago the team moved from base camp at elevation 4,230m up to the “Condor’s Nest” (high camp) at 5,550m. Yesterday morning, long before sunrise, the team departed high camp for their big push to the summit. They traveled across broad snow slopes, navigated crevasse fields, and traversed across the final, classic, knife-edged summit ridge to stand at 6,438m- the highest mountain in the…

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Announcing the Tahoe Via Ferrata

Watch the Tahoe Via Ferrata in action!

It’s Happening!

After years of dreaming and planning, we are BEYOND thrilled to officially announce the Tahoe Via Ferrata at Squaw Valley! The Tahoe Via Ferrata will ascend the iconic 1000’ Tram Face in Squaw Valley, our home, and one of the coolest rock faces around. Construction of the first two routes begins within the next few weeks and we plan to be operational by late September. We’re excited to bring the first Via Ferrata to the Lake Tahoe region!

Wait, What’s Via Ferrata?

If you’re unfamiliar with Via Ferrata,…

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Alpamayo Team Stationed at Base Camp

Blue-green jewels tucked between the jagged peaks of the Peruvian Andes.

The team arrived at base camp on Thursday, July 5. They trekked past the spectacularly beautiful Santa Cruz Lakes, blue-green jewels tucked between the jagged peaks of the Peruvian Andes. Then the team turned up into the hanging valley that sits beneath Alpamayo, setting up their base camp at tree-line, approximately 13,500’/4,115m. The report from our team via satellite text:

“Team is feeling good- a couple small headaches (from altitude) but the team is stoked!”

The team is currently stationed at base camp. Yesterday they climbed to 16,200’/4,938m to set up Moraine Camp and…

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To the Gem of the Cordillera Blanca!

Lunch with a view at Laguna Churup.

Our Alpamayo expedition is underway!

We have arrived The calm and peaceful mountain hamlet of Huaraz!

The team & their objective:

Alpamayo (19,512 feet/5,947 meters) is the gem of the Cordillera Blanca in Peru. Over the next two weeks, our team of 4 climbers will make their attempt at the iconic fluted Southwest Face.

Lead guide Nacho Espinosa: Nacho is a fully pinned IFMGA/UIAGM guide from Ecuador. He has guided dozens of high altitude technical peaks around the world and knows Alpamayo well. Nacho adds a wealth of authentic Andean experience to…

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The team has summited Cotopaxi successfully

Summit (19,347′ / 5,897m) at 7:30 am on June 12

The view of Cotopaxi from the drive in

Cumbre!

At 7:30 am on June 12, in near perfect conditions, 4 out of 5 of our Ecuador Climbing School team reached the top of Cotopaxi at 19,347′ / 5,897m. Guide Topo Mena reported, “Great weather, awesome views- the conditions were just perfect.”

Behind the team, you can see the spectacular sight of the volcano’s caldera. Thanks to a window of crystal clear weather, the team enjoyed stellar panoramic views- which was a treat considering how common poor

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Ecuador Climbing School Photo Journal

The first “big mountain experience” of the expedition was Cayambe (shown here).

 

The team chose to focus on building their climbing skills while on the glacier, instead of motoring straight for a summit.

 

In preparation for the next two big objectives – Cotopaxi (shown here) and Chimborazo, the team worked on skills including cramponing techniques and proper ice axe use.

 

The team also worked on how to pack a summit pack, tying climbing knots and hitches, roping up for glacier travel and rappelling.

 

Although much of the time spent on Cayambe…

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Everest Photo Wrap Up

Grand “Chomolungma” as it is known in Tibet. Standing proudly at el. 29,029′

122 Everest summits between this group!

“Office” view of our support crew with scope to watch climbers progress to the summit.

Although the new snow and sunshine looks pretty at Camp 2, it’s still really hard to convince yourself to get out of your warm sleeping bag in the morning.

Final blessings the day before the summit push

Everest Rapid Ascent Team on their way to Camp 3

Everest Rapid Ascent Team

Second summit push for the Cho Oyu…

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Everest Update

Rapid Ascent Team says farewell to Everest. Cho+Everest Team takes a second chance at a summit bid.

Everest Rapid Ascent Team: After a mass equipment failure forced both teams to abandon their summit pushes, the Rapid Ascent Team has made the difficult decision to end their Everest season. The team is currently descending to Everest Base Camp and they will head home in a couple days. After sharing an incredible and challenging experience over the past few weeks, the team is saying an emotional goodbye to one another and bidding a bittersweet farewell to Everest.

Everest Rapid Ascent…

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Everest Team Safely Descended to Advanced Base Camp

Lines fixed to the summit. Team’s high point at 8,500m.

During yesterday’s summit push, teams experienced a systemic failure of their oxygen systems. In the interest of everyone’s safety, the team made the tough decision to abandon their summit push and return to lower elevation. All team members, guides, and Sherpa have safely descended to Advanced Base Camp.

Guide Adrian Ballinger’s account of the situation, “As day broke, we were two teams – one at 28,000 feet; the other at 28,500 feet. Our night had been perfect – still, warm, and with all 25 of our guides,…

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Everest Summit Push Suspended

Due to a mass equipment failure, teams on Everest have stopped their summit push and have descended below 7,700m. All clients, guides, and Sherpa are safe and accounted for at this time.

Both of our Alpenglow Expeditions teams, along with other teams on Everest, were utilizing an industry standard supplemental oxygen system during their summit push. When multiple of the team’s oxygen bottle regulators malfunctioned, the team made the difficult decision to stop their summit push and return to lower elevation.

Since this time, it has become apparent that a defective batch of oxygen bottle regulators was…

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